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Grand Teton NP Fall Photo Shoot

By Marc Bowen

My favorite time of the year is fall. It’s also one of the busiest times of the year for me. So I don’t always get the opportunity to get over into the parks to photograph fall color. In Grand Teton NP the autumn colors usually peak the 2nd, 3rd or 4th week in September and unless you live in the valley near the park the timing can be difficult. I live about 60 miles from the park. It’s a beautiful drive over the mountain from home but it’s still a 2-hour drive each way.

In late September my friend Scott and I spent all day, sunrise to sunset shooting different areas in the park. Two months ago in July we were here for about three days photographing some of the same areas. If you are interested in reading more about our summer photo shoot go to Grand Teton NP Summer Photo Shoot.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Snake River Overlook

One of the first locations we stopped to photograph was the Snake River Overlook, a scene made famous by Ansel Adams. The texture of the clouds in the sky added interest to this scene as the early morning light brought a rosy glow to the Teton range.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Snake River Overlook

A lot of the trees in this area had already lost most of their leaves especially those along the river.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Snake River Overlook (late fall)
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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Snake River Overlook (summer)

I thought it would be fun to compare the two photos (above) which show the change of seasons.

From the Snake River Overlook we moved on up the river to Oxbow Bend.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Oxbow Bend

It was interesting to see that most of the trees in this area still had their leaves and some of those leaves were still green. The above image was captured from the ridge above the highway. Mt. Moran is the most prominent peak on the horizon.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Oxbow Bend

As we hiked that same ridge east we had several different shooting angles of the bend in the river. In the above photo you can just see a sliver of Jackson Lake at the base of  Mt. Moran in the distance.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

(Above photo) looking southeast from that same ridge.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Oxbow Bend

From here we dropped off the ridge, crossed the highway and walked the shore of the Snake River.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Oxbow Bend

The air was fairly cool with little to no wind. This enabled me to get this shot (above) of the river with a nice reflection of the mountains and autumn color.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Oxbow Bend (summer shot taken 2-months ago)

Similar shot (above). But this was shot two months ago in July just before sundown.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Schwabacher Landing

Next we drove back down the river to Schwabacher Landing. The colors were not as bright here but you can still see the contrast in color between the above photo taken in September and the photo below taken in July.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Schwabacher Landing (taken 2-months ago)

 

In the afternoon we drove east up towards Lower Slide Lake for a different view of the Teton Mountains.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – The Wedding Tree

A nice drive and a short hike later brought us to what is called the Wedding Tree by the locals in the area. In the lower right-hand corner of the above image above you can see a bouquet of flowers left there from the last wedding ceremony performed under the tree.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Scott under the Wedding Tree

We had a little fun with the wedding bouquet (above) and yes we did keep with tradition, placing the bouquet back at the base of the tree when Scott was finished mugging with it.

In the evening we headed back to Oxbow Bend to wait for the sun to set.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Oxbow Bend at sunset

While sitting on the ridge above Oxbow Bend we enjoyed watching the changes in light and color at sunset. Like sunrises, sunsets are always different and we never really know what we are going to see. This sunset didn’t disappoint…a fitting end to an enjoyable fall day in the Tetons!

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Grand Teton NP Summer Photo Shoot

By Marc Bowen

My friend Scott and I decided to spend three days in Grand Teton National Park and just travel around the area stopping anywhere we felt like shooting, all hours of the day and/or night. We would not purchase lodging anywhere but would sleep in Scott’s truck (when and if we took time to sleep). We would take enough food and water with us to allow us the freedom of driving into town only if it became necessary.

We left my house about 7:00am and drove to Jackson Wyoming by way of Ririe, Swan Valley and Victor. We rolled into Jackson at 9:00am, parked and checked out the Thomas Mangelsen Photography Studio, for inspiration? To ‘focus’ on our objective? (pun intended, sorry) I think we were just excited about what we were here for and wanted to admire another photographer’s photos of this area. We then headed out to the park to scout possible sites in which to photograph sunsets, sunrises and the Milky-Way.

Mormon Row

Our first stop was Mormon Row, a historical district with the remains of old homesteads built by members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the early 1900s. It’s located in what’s known as Antelope Flats east of the Jackson-Moran highway.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Mormon Row

The two barns in this area are two of the most photographed barns in the country. Both of us have probably filled up lots of memory cards with images of these barns over the years but there seems to be this need to improve and get better and make each captured image better than the last. I used to stress over that aspect of my photography but have since tried to be more relaxed, more patient and enjoy my surroundings, trying not to be disappointed if I don’t capture an image in the way I had hoped.

Today the clouds were great so we couldn’t resist spending an hour here seeing what we might capture.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen –  Scott shooting the John Moulton Barn

My favorite type of photography is landscape/nature photography. I do like to put people in my shots on occasion. Especially people I know. When shooting with Scott or my daughter Nicole (also a photographer) It’s easy to ‘include’ them in the shot even when they are unaware. Scott (in above photo) is a master at landscape photography and brilliantly puts his own stamp on often-shot scenes.

After about an hour of watching the clouds and light play we moved on up the highway to another popular and often-shot scene.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Snake River Overlook (day one)

At the Snake River Overlook we watched some awesome cloud formations over the Teton range. The light which was attempting to break through the clouds created all the right conditions for a black and white. I wanted the focus of this image (above photo) to be on the light rather than the colors in the scene.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Snake River Overlook

But this scene looks good in color too.

We decided to head back down the highway and drop off the hill down to the river and another very popular location.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Schwabacher Landing (day one)

Schwabacher Landing

Located on the Snake River and not too far off the highway is Schwabacher Landing. Just like Mormon Row I’ve been here many times. Even so, it never gets old. Each time is a little different. Different seasons. Different animals present (or not). Different weather. Different cloud formations. Different company. I love this place, the sights, sounds, smell and general ‘feel’ of this area. It’s like something special is going to happen and I’m going to miss it if I’m not here…

Lucky for us because of the cloud formations (above photo) the light was still good late morning at Schwabacher Landing and we had a few ducks posing for us as well.

In order for us to decide where we would be shooting sunset and the Milky-Way that night we decided to scout some more locations. We drove out to Oxbow Bend, Colter Bay, Jenny Lake and Signal Mountain. We checked out Oxbow Bend for a possible sunrise or sunset shoot. Colter Bay on Jackson Lake provides some possibilities for photographing the Milky-Way with interesting foreground.

I have an app named SKY GUIDE that shows me where in the night sky the Milky-Way galaxy or any planet is going to be and what time it will be there. It’s a must-have for astrophotography.

We drove to the top of Signal Mountain, checked the future location of the Milky-Way using the  SKY GUIDE app and decided that this would be the location from which we would shoot the Milky-Way on this first night in the park.

Other then driving through Jackson in the morning we never made it back to town the rest of the day and would spend the night on Signal Mountain. We had plenty of snacks to eat throughout the day. Protein bars, Kind Bars, breakfast bars, apple chips, dried fruit, trail mix, almonds, V8 Fusion Energy drinks and plenty of water.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

Oxbow Bend

One of the most photographed locations in Grand Teton National Park is Oxbow Bend. It’s such a beautiful area in any season. The bend of the Snake River with majestic Mt. Moran in the background is a breathtaking sight. No matter how many times I have photographed this scene I can’t drive through here without stopping and taking some shots. It’s almost guaranteed that dozens of other photographers will be there right at my elbow.

We decided to use this location for our first sunset shoot. We got here a few hours early, picked our spot, set up cameras, tripods and camp chairs and waited, taking a few shots here and there as the light changed. It was hot! I had already soaked-up plenty of sunshine throughout the day. Mosquitos harassed us but we saw herons, beaver and pelicans while we waited. As we sat there other people came. Some stopped to take photos, others fished or glassed the area with binoculars for wildlife. Many, like us, stayed for the sunset.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Oxbow Bend sunset 9:05pm

Sunsets always seem more colorful here. Maybe it’s because the landscape is so awesome that any extra color just accentuates the scene. Having some clouds in the sky can make a sunset even more interesting by scattering the light and color in beautiful displays across the sky and water.

After sunset we headed over to the Colter Bay area on Jackson Lake for some ‘Blue Hour’ shots.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Colter Bay twilight

Colter Bay – The BLUE hour.

My friend Scott showed me just how beautiful the blue-hour can be. That 45-60 minute period after the sun goes down is a great time to capture some long-exposure shots.

Scott suggested we get some images here (Colter Bay) to possibly use as foreground for the Milky-Way shots we would capture from Signal Mountain that night. We stood on this beach in the dark, cameras on tripods as we tried to capture the image we wanted. The photo (above) is deceptive in that it appears to still be fairly light out which is what happens with a long-exposure shot. In fact it was almost too dark for me to see the stump in front of me without my headlamp.

A few minutes later we drove south and then west along Jackson Lake and just past Signal Mountain lodge turned left on Signal Mountain Road. It’s about a five-mile, 20 minute, 1000 foot climb of switchbacks to an observation area at the top of the mountain. Set far apart from any other mountain peak Signal Mountain provides some breathtaking views of the Teton mountain range, Jackson Lake and the flat glacial plains below. There is a parking lot with restrooms and picnic table. From there we had a short climb up the trail using our flashlights to navigate by as we entered the observation area. Using headlamps we set up our camera equipment and camp chairs.

We started shooting just after 11:00pm facing south with the Milky-Way arching across the sky from the north (behind us) over the top of us with the thicker part of the formation above and in front of us to the south.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Signal Mountain observation area (elev. 7900ft)

(above photo) Night view from the top of Signal Mountain. You can barely see the wooden rail that surrounds the viewing area. The lights from the Jackson area are in the distance and lights from traffic on the Jackson-Moran highway stretch for miles. We saw falling stars, bright planets (Mars and Saturn) and aircraft moving across the sky. It was cold up here at almost 8000 feet even though I had several layers of clothing on (long sleeve t-shirt, light weight hoodie, fleece jacket and wind breaker) I was wishing I had brought my down coat.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Milky-Way with a bright Mars shining to the left of Milky-Way

I brought two cameras with me on this trip. A Nikon D610 with Nikon 14×24 wide-angle lens that I brought for my long-exposure shots and a Sony A7II with 28×70 lens that I prefer using for my daylight landscapes (personal preference because of the smaller size and weight). I didn’t know until I got home that I shot all my night shots in .jpg format instead of raw format. I was mystified at first because I never shoot in .jpg with either camera but figured out that while fumbling around with settings in the dark on the beach at Colter Bay I must have bumped the ‘quality’ button. Because of the compressed format of these images there’s not much I can do with them in post-processing especially if I want to combine one of these Milky-Way shots with one of the Colter Bay blue-hour images. Just glad I used the Sony camera (which was set for raw format) for all my other images.

We shot the Milky-Way until about 2:00am. Those who haven’t shot the Milky-Way as it moves across the night sky should try it sometime. I’m a novice but was lucky to have the opportunity to stand beside and learn from an expert. Three hours of shooting in the dark on top of a mountain can be a wonderful experience. The sound of the wind blowing through the trees. The smells of the forest, mountains and rivers in the night air and good conversation while looking up at the spinning celestial wonders above is one of those things in life that shouldn’t be missed.

At 2:00am we packed up our equipment, climbed into Scott’s truck, kicked the seats back and got a few hours sleep. We left Signal Mountain about 4:45 am and drove back to Mormon Row to shoot the blue-hour and sunrise.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Mormon Row blue-hour 

Back to Mormon Row. arrived at 5:30 am. Not as many clouds in the sky this morning so we weren’t sure what kind of sunrise we would get. A few other photographers showed up as we waited for the sunrise. Sunrise happened around 6:00am.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – John Moulton Barn (second day)

(Above photo) I always enjoy watching the first light of the morning sun hit the tops of the Tetons and warm up the surrounding area. The mountains are a perfect back-drop for the old barn. John Moulton’s barn is built of logs and was built sometime between 1908 and 1916.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – John Moulton House

John Moulton’s house sits just to the south of the barn on the homestead and has pink-tinted stucco walls. It was built around 1938 and replaced the original house. I enjoyed the play of warm light filtering through the trees onto the front of the house. Turned the pink to almost a peach-color.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Thomas Alma Moulton barn

Farther to the south is John Moulton’s brother’s homestead. This is another popular barn to photograph. The Mormon Row area is so popular that the historical district put a restroom near by to accommodate the needs of the thousands of photographers and tourists that flock to this site every year.

After some shots of this barn we drove over to Black Tail Ponds located on the opposite side of the highway from Antelope Flats.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Black Tail Ponds overlook

Black Tail Ponds overlook is just west of the Highway. It’s on a bench overlooking a lush area of trees, grass, willows and beaver ponds. Prime habitat for wildlife. I have seen Elk, Moose and bear in this location. There are several companys that run wildlife safari’s out of Jackson. One of them was at this location letting there clients take turns looking through a spotting scope they had setup. The scope has an attachment that fits your mobile phone and enables you to take photos using the powerful lens of the spotting scope. While we were there we watched a young bull moose chasing a cow moose out of the tree line and through the willows and ponds.

We then went north a short drive up the highway to Schwabacher Landing where we were the day before.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Schwabacher Landing (second day)

Very little in the way of clouds gives the scenes a slightly different look then the shots from yesterday. This scene (above) is several hundred yards from the parking area. There is a path from here that leads to a beaver pond that is also very scenic.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Beaver pond (second day)

Got some good mountain reflection in the water this day and the few clouds moving through added interest to the scene.

From Schwabacher Landing we got back out on the highway drove south and turned to go through the unincorporated town of Moose Wyoming and through the south entrance into Grand Teton National Park.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

Just past the entrance to the park we turned right to check out the Chapel of the Transfiguration. I have shot this beautiful little chapel many times in every season. It is quite picturesque with the back drop of the Teton mountains and has lots of history. Always worth stopping here when in the area.

We drove on to Jenny Lake but with its popularity and all the renovation construction going on, it’s almost impossible to find parking during mid-day. Today was no exception so we decided to head into Jackson to grab some lunch. By now, because of lack of sleep we were getting very tired and pulled over into a rest-area near the Taggart/Bradley lakes trailhead. We found some shade and with windows open to get a nice cross-breeze napped for a while.

After our nap we drove to Jackson via Teton Park Road, then Moose-Wilson Road, saw some deer and then a young grizzly wearing a tracking collar crossed the road in front of us. We also checked out the Laurance Rockefeller Preserve.

In Jackson after grabbing a bite to eat we took some time and walked through four of the many art galleries. When finished with this inspirational tour, Scott bought us some ice cream at Moo’s Gourmet Ice Cream. Their Key-Lime ice-cream is fantastic!

After leaving Jackson, Scott asked me if I knew about the old homestead used as one of the ranches in the movie ‘Shane’. I hadn’t so we drove out to Kelly and then up the hill to check out what was left of the ranch. We explored further up the road and stopped at a turnout and an overlook.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Lower Slide Lake

Lower Slide Lake (above photo) sits in this little valley and is a natural made reservoir. It was created when the Gros Ventre landslide of 1925 dammed the Gros Ventre River. It’s hard to miss the beautiful colors of the Red Hills overlooking the lake.

With plenty of time still on our hands we drove back out towards Moran and took a look at the old Cunningham Cabin. At this point we were growing tired again so found some shade down on the Snake River at a put-in point used by rafting companies and slept some more. Nothing better than being lulled to sleep by the breezes rustling the leaves in the trees and the sound of rushing waters from the river. We drove from there to Colter Bay, checked out the marina and surrounding area then hiked a trail which took us around the shores of the bay. Then on to Jenny Lake / Leigh Lake area. On the way there we stopped at the Mountain View Turnout which has a view looking south down the valley and the Cathedral Group of the Tetons. We decided this would be the place we would shoot the Milky-Way from this night. A photographer we had met at Mormon Row that morning joined us while we shot the Milky-Way as it moved from left to right on the horizon (our perspective – earth is turning to the left).

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Milky-Way from the Mountain View turnout.

Again it was beautiful but cold as we all stood together visiting, wearing head lamps, layered clothing and snacking. We shot the night sky from about 10:30pm to around 12:30am.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Milky-Way over the edge of the Cathedral Group of Tetons.

Then Scott and I loaded up, said goodbye to the other photographer and headed back to Mormon Row to rest for a few hours with the intention of shooting the sunrise at Schwabacher Landing.

This second day was a good day, fun although a day with very few clouds. Great for shooting milky-way astrophotography but not so much for sunrises/sunsets. When we arrived at Mormon Row we climbed in the back of Scott’s pickup this time and stretched out on mattress’ in our sleeping bags. Went to sleep shortly after 1:30am hoping the next day would dawn with some clouds in the sky.

We awakened about 4:30am to the sound of rain drops on the camper-shell roof and the first thing Scott said was, ‘We got our clouds!’

We quickly got our gear together and drove over toward Schwabacher Landing. The clouds were looking pretty darn awesome over the mountains, no light on them yet. At the last-minute Scott suggested we stop at Glacier View Turnout first, set up and see what happens. And then…magic happened! What we experienced next took our breath away!!

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Teton sunrise

A glorious Teton Sunrise! This was such a special and magical moment. As we stood there and watched the light hit the tops of the mountains the colors were soft and subtle in the beginning but then the yellows and the oranges started appearing in the clouds above and mountains below and the view just kept getting better and better.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Flaming skies

It looked to me as if the sky was on fire. We were amazed and humbled by the sight of so much majesty!

After about 10-15 minutes of shooting from Glacier View Turnout we quickly loaded back up in the truck and drove down the hill to Schwabacher Landing. There were dozens of photographers on the river just as amazed by the sight we had beheld as we were. As we were unloading our gear and heading out along the river a good share of the photographers were leaving allowing us to set up with no one in front of us.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Schwabacher Landing (third day)

The clouds were still amazing even after the orange color had faded away.

As we were standing there with this scene in front of us I visited with a photographer who had come up and setup his camera and tripod next to me. He said he travels here from Texas every year to photograph this area and told me that one time as he stood here a few years back, a rainbow appeared and he was able to get some awesome shots. A short time later while we talked it started to rain a little and then he said excitedly, “Here comes the rainbow!”

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

And that’s when God painted a rainbow for me to photograph. It was there between me and the mountain only for a few moments but the timing and placement was perfect. More magic!

After the rainbow disappeared Scott and I walked over to the beaver ponds.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Beaver Pond (third day)

Here the water was calm, there being no wind, creating another beautiful reflection of the mountains on the surface of the water.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Beaver pond and beaver lodge

We finished up here and headed down the highway to the Snake River overlook to see how things looked from there.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Snake River overlook (third day)

The bits of sunlight filtering through the rain clouds gave us another great photo opportunity.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Ansel Adams was here

This scene (above) made famous by Ansel Adams.

I learned a lot on this trip. I learned that fun times can be had photographing most of the day and night with little thought of food or sleep. I learned that ‘Blue Hour’ is basically the twilight hour before sunrise and after sunset and that the Milky-Way is an exceptionally beautiful thing to watch over a period of several hours as our planet spins within it. Makes me think about all those other planets and solar systems out there and how we mortals on this planet and those on other planets in other solar systems are staring with wonderful awe up into this same Milky-Way. Makes a person’s problems seem very small and opens the mind to some wondrous possibilities. If a night or two on top of a mountain under the stars can expand the mind and bring peace as well as wonder to the soul, who wouldn’t love it. I for one, am better for the experience.

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Trip To Yellowstone National Park

By Marc Bowen

My wife and I had an enjoyable trip to Yellowstone with my parents. It had been two years since we were there last. The park is only about 80 miles from our home, about a two-hour drive. You would think we would go more often.

The Mesa Falls Scenic By-Way

On the way there we stopped at Lower and Upper Mesa Falls. My parents said its been about 35 years since they last drove the Mesa Falls Scenic By-way. It is a beautiful drive and worth the visit to see both falls and visitor center.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

Big Springs, Island Park

We also stopped at Big Springs in Island Park. It was the first time any of us have been there. Big Springs is a first-magnitude spring and produces over 120 gallons of water each day. It’s also the head waters of the Henry’s Fork of the Snake River. Beautiful place but we forgot our mosquito repellent and had to out-run them most of the time we were there.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen
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Photo by: Marc Bowen

The Seagulls were out in force and used to being fed by the tourists.

West Yellowstone

We arrived in West Yellowstone, checked into our room and then visited the Grizzly and Wolf Discovery Center across the street. Interesting exhibit although I would rather see the animals free instead of caged. I do understand the Discovery Centers mission and the center is well set up and informative.

Our evening was spent in the Park.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

If you haven’t been to Yellowstone you should know that the buffalo (or bison if you’re not a native of Idaho or Wyoming) are the most plentiful of the animals in the park and although they look as tame as cattle, more visitors are injured by them than by other critters. But I wouldn’t blame the buffalo. It’s the stupid humans who think they can back up against them and take a selfie while the animal eats grass. It used to be when I was a kid it was the bears causing the traffic jams in the park. Now its the buffalo. Best to just be patient and enjoy the show.

We took the Firehole River loop and enjoyed seeing white-water and waterfalls.

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Firehole Falls – Photo by: Marc Bowen
Firehole River Gorge
Cascades of the Firehole – Photo by: Marc Bowen

We then continued on down the road to the Lower Geyser Basin which is the largest geyser basin (11 square miles) in the park.

Evening seemed  the perfect time of day to visit not only because of the great light and cooler temperature. We noticed a huge line of cars headed out of the park when we were headed in so that by the time we reached the basin, crowds were pretty small.

 

Fountain Paint Pot Trail, Lower Geyser Basin

A good share of this trail is paved and the rest is all boardwalk.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

 

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Silex Spring – Photo by: Marc Bowen
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Fountain Paint Pots – Photo by: Marc Bowen
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Red Spouter – Photo by: Marc Bowen
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Clepsydra Geyser – Photo by: Marc Bowen

 

 

Mammoth Hot Springs

The next day we drove up to Mammoth Hot Springs at the north end of the park. It’s a beautiful drive and there are many places to stop, stretch your legs and see something new.

Mammoth Hot Springs is a large complex of hot springs on a hill of travertine and is adjacent to Fort Yellowstone and The Mammoth Hot Springs Historic District. We chose to stop at the lower terraces and I walked the board walk there enjoying each of the springs along the way.

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Lower Terraces boardwalk – Photo by: Marc Bowen
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Looking across Lower Terraces to the town of Mammoth Hot Springs – Photo by: Marc Bowen
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Photo by: Marc Bowen
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Photo by: Marc Bowen
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Photo by: Marc Bowen
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Photo by: Marc Bowen
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Photo by: Marc Bowen

We only spent parts of two days in the park and just scratched the surface of the beautiful canyons, alpine rivers, lush forests, hot springs, numberless wildlife and gushing geysers that await visitors here. Every time I visit I am always amazed at the size of this park. Yellowstone is huge, covering 3,500 square miles. Lots to see and less time to visit then we would have liked but we had a wonderful time and look forward to our next visit!

 

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Paintbrush Canyon and Holly Lake

By: Marc Bowen

 

Hike to Holly Lake

  • Trail location: Leigh Lake Trail
  • Roundtrip length: 13 miles
  • Trailhead elevation: 6875 feet
  • Total elevation gain: 2575 feet
  • Highest elevation: 9424 feet
  • Trail difficulty: 18.15 (strenuous)

*above info provided by TetonHikingTrails.com

 

Getting There

I left home this morning at 4:30 am so I would arrive at the trailhead by 6:30 am. The drive just before sunrise is beautiful as usual . I have been choosing to go to Jackson by way of Rexburg and Driggs in the early mornings to avoid animals on the road. The road over the mountain between Swan Valley and Victor, although a slightly shorter drive time,  tends to have more animals on the road before daylight (in my experience). I do enjoy seeing wildlife, just not in my headlights on a winding mountain road in the ‘wee’ hours of the morning.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Jenny Lake Rd

To get to the Paintbrush Canyon Trailhead I drove through the Moose Wyoming entrance on Teton Park Road, then turned left on Jenny Lake Road (which is a beautiful scenic loop drive by the way), then right on String Lake Road. I parked in the String Lake parking lot and then began hiking the Leigh Lake Trail.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

For the first .8 miles the trail follows along the shores of String Lake and there are some great views of Mt. Moran along the way.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – String Lake & Mt. Moran

Mount Moran was very beautiful in the morning light. I have hiked this trail before on the way to Leigh Lake, Bear Paw and Trapper lakes. To read more about that hike please click the link Hiking the Leigh Lake Trail to Bear Paw & Trapper Lakes.

String Lake and Leigh Lake are connected by a short but wide stream. At this point in the hike there is a fork in the trail. Go right if you want to go to Leigh Lake and the Leigh Lake portage area or left across the foot bridge to the String Lake Loop trail and the Paintbrush Canyon trailhead.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Leigh Lake outlet

 

Paintbrush Canyon Trailhead

After I crossed the foot bridge across the Leigh Lake outlet I followed the trail in a gradual climb through Lodgepole pine forests and then took a right fork in the trail at the Paintbrush Canyon Trailhead. Along this part of the trail I enjoyed brief views of Leigh Lake and the valley and hills to the east.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Leigh Lake

A little distance up the trail from the beautiful Leigh Lake views the trail began to turn toward Paintbrush Canyon and was almost overgrown with huckleberry plants in some places.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Huckleberries along Paintbrush Canyon trail

 

At this point I had a few glimpses of Mt. Moran through the trees to the right of the trail.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Mt. Moran from Paintbrush trail

 

And Rockchuck Peak to the left of the trail.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Rockchuck Peak

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Huckleberry plants can grow to 6.5 feet tall

In this area of the trail the huckleberry plants are huge . The plants were as high as my head in some places. No ripe berries on them yet that I noticed but a good place to make a lot of noise to avoid surprising a bear. I wasn’t stressing it because there were plenty of  hikers ahead of me and behind me.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Paintbrush Canyon Creek

I could hear Paintbrush Canyon Creek long before I was able to see it. The water had a slight aqua tint to it making the falling water very nice to look at.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Lower Paintbrush Canyon campsite area

There are a few campsites in this area of Lower Paintbrush Canyon. Some are first-come-first-serve and some sites can be reserved.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Leigh & Jackson Lakes in the distance

(Above photo) Just off this part of the trail I saw that someone had their tent pitched facing down the canyon so that they would wake up to this view in the morning!

 

Bridge
Photo by: Marc Bowen

This bridge (above) was the second bridge I crossed at this point in my hike.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

Directly to the left of the bridge is a beautiful little waterfall.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

To the right of the bridge Paintbrush Canyon Creek streams off in the direction of Mount Moran.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

Not too far after I crossed the bridge the canyon opens up for a short way and I noticed a lot of the trees here were leaning way over to my left, all in the same direction, or were completely broken off.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

As I looked to my right I could see more damaged trees and tree stumps. In the above photo you can see all this and piles of snow. I’m assuming the snow is what’s left of an avalanche that came down the ravine and took out a lot of these trees.

By the way. The reason this canyon is called Paintbrush Canyon is because it is usually filled with wildflowers. Columbine and Indian Paintbrush are a very common site everywhere. Just not now. Too early probably. Maybe in a few more weeks.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

The canyon then narrows and the trail follows the creek for several bends. As I stopped to take the above photo, 3 trail-runners (men) moved at good speed past me and up the canyon. I’m always amazed and impressed by people who run these trails. This trail is strenuous enough just walking. I can’t imagine running up it!

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Paintbrush Canyon Creek
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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Paintbrush Canyon Creek

As the trail increased in altitude I noticed the stream began disappearing under snow fields and then reappearing again.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

As the snow melts, the water rolls off these canyon walls and adds volume to the swift flowing Paintbrush Canyon Creek.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Paintbrush Canyon Trail

Some of the stream crossings require some ‘rock-hopping’. This is where I’m glad I use trekking poles. I can stabilize myself and prevent myself from falling when stepping on wet or loose rocks in the stream.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen (iPhone Pano)

I used my iPhone for the above photo to get a multi-shot panoramic view as I followed the trail up into more snow fields.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – rock cairn – looking back down the trail

At the beginning of a large snow field someone had made the above cairn. Looking just ahead up the canyon the trail disappears underneath a snow field and from here I could not see where the field ended or the trail emerged. I decided to walk in a straight line up the canyon and soon I saw another rock cairn up some distance in front of me near a rock slide.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – rock cairn

As I stepped back onto the trail just past this cairn I turned and enjoyed this view with lakes and mountains in the distance.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

From here I could easily see Leigh Lake (closest) and Jackson Lake in the distance.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

At this elevation the switch-backs in the trail start crossing snowy areas and created some tense moments while traversing the snow. The snow is rather hard and can be slick. I took the above photo as an example. Again, trekking poles were a great help to me.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen  – View from the trail
Switchbacks
Photo by: Marc Bowen

These last parts of the trail were quite a ‘slog’. I worked up some serious sweat on these switch-backs.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – trail from String Lake to Holly Lake

I was compensated for this strenuous portion of the hike with some stunning views!

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

The trail eventually disappears again under snow. I followed the tracks of previous hikers up this gully.  Again it was difficult walking on the slick hard snow. I noticed traces of the actual trail up the slope to my left (I found out later that underneath this whole area of  snow is a scree field). As I walked near boulders sticking up out of the snow I used my trekking poles to test the snow in those areas. I saw a few places where a hiker’s feet had broken through the snow up to their thighs near some of the rocks. As the day grew warmer the footing was becoming treacherous.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

I made the decision to try and get out of the snow and climb-up the slope to where I had seen traces of the actual trail. But this was so steep and slick that I realized why some previous hikers had chosen to hike up the bottom of the gully. So I climbed still further up the slope until I reached a ridge of rock with very little snow and worked my way to the top of the gully. My decision to travel this ridge turned out to be a bad one.

As I climbed over a few large boulders and planted my right foot down between a few smaller ones, I lost my balance and fell. As I fell I immediately tried to jerk my foot out from between the rocks fearing my leg would snap. I was able to get one of my trekking poles between my upper-body and the ground and keep me from going all the way down. But not before taking a chunk of flesh off my shin and the strain on my right leg causing a horribly painful and long-lasting cramp in my calf that took my breath away. After the cramp went away I was relieved that I hadn’t broken the leg. I pulled my pant-leg up to look at my shin which looked nasty enough that I didn’t want to look at it again. I stood up and experienced no small amount of pain as I put weight on the leg and that had me worried. I wasn’t sure how this pain would affect my hike back down the mountain. I didn’t have a lot of choices so I carefully worked my way off the rocky ridge and then down the steep snowy slope (literally by the seat of my pants).

At this point I saw a sign sticking out of the snowy ground indicating that Holly Lake was just a half-mile away. That got the adrenaline going in me and I decided I had come this far and was not going to head back before seeing the lake.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – trail to Holly Lake

I found the trail again and a section where the snow had melted and stopped to rest, looking over my back-trail and the beautiful view.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

As I hiked further up the trail I followed the tracks of someone going up the slope of snow ahead of me to the left (above photo).

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

After hiking up the slope and down the other side I saw a small lake before me and a group of people relaxed, sitting on rocks and enjoying the view.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

I chatted with several of the people there at the lake. Everyone was rather proud of themselves for making it this far and most were resting and eating lunch before heading back down.

Paintbrush Canyon Trail continues on up the mountain behind the trees to the left of the lake (above photo) and eventually over the divide at an elevation of 10,700 feet. I was told by a hiker, who had hiked up that section of trail a-ways, that he watched some people climb up and over the wall of snow covering the divide. He said they had crampons and ice-axes but had fallen a few times before disappearing over the top. Crazy!

One of the guys I met at the lake was hiking alone as I was. His name was Leon. He had a heavy accent and I asked him where he was from. He said he was from Brazil and had traveled here to spend a week hiking the Tetons. He said he had hiked all over the world including the Swiss Alps and Patagonia in Chile.

As we chatted everyone else had headed back down the mountain and we decided we should probably do the same. Then two woman arrived, one of them saying, ” You guys do know this isn’t Holly Lake don’t you?” Apparently the lake we were sitting at has no name. I asked her where Holly Lake was located and she pointed up the mountain saying the trail to the lake was impassable because of the snow but was probably a 15-20 minute hike if we worked our way up through the trees, over the hill and into the cirque where we would find the lake.

I turned to Leon and suggested we work together to find the lake. We both had maps on our phones but with the trails covered with snow all we could tell from the map was the general direction of the lake which had already been pointed out to us.

On our way there we also ran into a park ranger who had just been up there so we back-tracked his trail to get there.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Holly Lake outlet

Leon ahead of me (above photo) hiking in to the ‘real’ Holly Lake.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Holly Lake (iPhone Pano)

This lake was definitely bigger then the lake with no name.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Holly Lake

Holly lake sits at an elevation of 9424 feet. Not sure how deep it is but it was still half covered in ice and snow….The clouds were gorgeous in the early afternoon. But every time a particularly large bunch of clouds rolled through the temperature would drop, the wind would start blowing, sometimes so hard that I had to quickly grab my hat before it blew away down the mountain. Then the sun would shine, the wind would die and I would relax , eating my lunch and totally soaking in the views around me. I reflected on all my blessings, being healthy enough to do these hikes I enjoy, my wife and family, my faith, and all god’s beautiful creations…And…I suddenly noticed my leg didn’t hurt anymore!

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Holly Lake

This is a beautiful lake and I am so glad that someone kindly let me know that I was at the wrong lake because I would have been sorely disappointed when I got back home and found out after all that pain and effort, I missed the lake that was my goal by a half mile!

I would love to come back here sometime when there is less snow and hike over the divide into Lake Solitude on the other side.

This has been a great adventure and I’m glad I survived it! As Always I look forward to the next one!!

 

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Across Jenny Lake to Cascade Canyon

By Marc Bowen

 

About three weeks ago I hiked the Taggart Lake-Bradley Lake Loop trail in Grand Teton National Park. If you would like to read about that hike please read my blog post at Hike into Taggart and Bradley Lakes . Today I talked my daughter Nicole into taking a day off from her busy schedule and driving to a trailhead just a mile up the road from where my last hike began.

Jenny Lake Trailhead

Glacially carved Jenny Lake is the second largest lake in the park covering about 1191 acres. It’s also one of the deepest at 423 feet. It’s named after a Shoshone woman named Jenny who married a trapper by the name of Richard “Beaver Dick” Leigh. They were both part of the Hayden Expedition to the area in 1872. Richard worked as a guide and Jenny assisted with camp logistics. Nearby Leigh Lake is named after Richard Leigh. Sadly in 1876 Jenny and their six children died of smallpox.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Jenny Lake in early morning before sunrise (photo taken 1 year ago Aug. 2016)

We parked in the Jenny Lake boat launch area, put on our packs and gear and headed down to the east boat dock. Our destination today would be Cascade Canyon.

 

Cascade Canyon Trailhead

Cascade Canyon is located on the west side of Jenny Lake and we had two options for getting there. We could hike 2.5 miles around the south end of the lake on the Jenny Lake Loop Trail or take a shuttle boat across the lake to Cascade Canyon Trailhead.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Jenny Lake shuttle boat launch

 

Many hikers take the shuttle especially if they are hiking all the way up the canyon to the Forks. The shuttle boat cuts-off 2.4 miles of walking each way and makes what would be about a 15-mile hike a 10-mile hike instead.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

The shuttle costs $15 round trip and boats launch every 10-15 minutes from 7am to 7pm daily all summer long. Lake cruises are also available.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

The 12-minute ride across the lake was nice with absolutely stunning views of the Tetons!

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Jenny Lake west shore boat dock, GTNP

The Jenny Lake west shore boat dock sets at the base of Cascade Canyon and the mountains tower over this area.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Nicole shooting scenery on the Jenny Lake shuttle

 

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Photo by: Nicole Klingler – Marc on the Jenny Lake shuttle

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Jenny Lake west shore boat dock, GTNP

There is a lot to do and see when you leave the west boat dock. Hidden Falls is a half-mile away and Inspiration Point is a mile away. We found out that there is actually an upper Inspiration Point and a lower Inspiration Point. If hiking to the upper point you take the Cascade Canyon Trail and the lower point is just off the trail to Hidden Falls.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Nicole on Cascade Canyon Trail, GTNP

We headed up Cascade Canyon Trail on our way to the upper Inspiration Point. This trail is beautiful and the first 1/4 – 1/2 mile was pretty steep and winds through pristine conifer forest and patches of huckleberries.

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Photo by: Nicole Klingler – Marc hiking Cascade Canyon Trail, GTNP

About one mile from the boat dock is the side trail to Inspiration Point. We were so busy taking pictures that we walked right past this left fork without seeing it and continued on and up the canyon.

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Photo by: Nicole Klingler – Marc in Cascade Canyon, GTNP

 

Cascade Canyon, Grand Teton National Park

This trail takes you 5 miles up the canyon to north and south forks in the trail. At the forks a left takes you down the south fork of Cascade Canyon and a right takes you in the direction of Lake Solitude.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Nicole on Cascade Canyon Trail, GTNP

There were breathtaking views of Mount Owen (12,928 ft) and Mount Teewinot (12,325 ft) as they towered high over the canyon floor.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Nicole in Cascade Canyon, GTNP

At this point the canyon starts widening as the trail follows the stream at a gentle grade up the canyon.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Cascade Canyon Creek, GTNP

Just beyond this point there is some flat water and a lot of willows, perfect habitat for moose. We actually saw a big bull moose just off the trail a short distance farther up from here. He was magnificent, shoulder deep in the brush, dark brown with antlers covered in dark brown velvet. I took a few shots at him with my camera but the resulting images were not satisfactory.

We talked to some hikers coming down the canyon and they warned us of a female black bear with cubs just off the trail about a mile farther up. By now we knew we had missed the trail to Inspiration Point and decided this was probably as good a time as any to turn around and head back down the canyon.

 

Inspiration Point (upper)

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Jenny Lake from upper Inspiration Point

Roughly a mile back down the trail we found the side trail to Inspiration Point that we had missed. A few minutes later we were there.  Quite a view of the lake and valley from up there. In the above photo shuttles can be seen running between the east and west boat docks.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Inspiration Point

When Nicole and I got to this point there were quite a few people out enjoying the view. I used my iPhone to get this pano and thought it was a good representation of the view we had from there.

 

Hidden Falls, Grand Teton National Park

From Inspiration Point we hiked back down towards the boat dock with the intention of heading over to Hidden Falls. The skies up until this point had been cloudy off and on but now we started feeling a few drops of rain which wasn’t a concern at first. But as we started getting closer to the dock and the side trail to Hidden Falls, a heavy rain began to fall. We could hear thunder echoing down the canyon walls and see flashes of light a short distance up the canyon from us. Lightning! I love watching storms from my front porch but having lightning in the area while hiking is a real concern. There really isn’t a ‘safe’ place to be. As the storm continued the rain turned to hail and we saw dozens of people moving fast toward the boat dock. I knew the boats weren’t going anywhere until the storm ended. People were gathered under trees, umbrellas, coats or what ever they could hold over there heads. Every time lightning flashed I wondered where it was going to hit next. Nicole and I moved into the brush under thick, dense pine trees put rain gear on and waited it out and as the rain began to subside we headed up the trail to Hidden Falls.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Nicole at Hidden Falls, GTNP

Hidden Falls drops about 200 feet down a series of ‘stairs’. We could hear the roar of the falls long before we could see it. There was so much water coming down the falls while we were there that it was creating a thick cloak of mist.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Hidden Falls, GTNP

After we left the falls we took a side trail to what is now called  ‘lower’ Inspiration Point. The storm had completely passed to the east and in the photo below you can see the dark clouds of the thunderstorm across Jenny Lake.

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Nicole at Lower Inspiration Point

After a quick hike back to the boat dock we waited for the next boat, boarded and crossed the lake again. Then back to the parking lot, we loaded our gear into the car and headed back home.

Despite the lightning, rain and hail it was a great day for a hike! I really like Cascade Canyon. Definitely one of the most scenic I’ve hiked so far. I’m sure I will be back. But next time I’m there I want to hike all the way up the canyon then north to Lake Solitude, one of the most beautiful lakes in the park.

Till next time…

Get out and hike!

 

 

 

 

 

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Hike into Taggart and Bradley Lakes

By Marc Bowen

Taggart Lake-Bradley Lake Loop hike

  • Location – Grand Teton National Park
  • Taggart Lake Trailhead elevation – 6625 feet
  • Hike length (in and out) – 5.5 miles
  • Total Elevation Gain – 585 feet
  • Highest Elevation – 7190 feet
  • Trail Difficulty Rating – 6.67 (moderate)

*The above info courtesy of TetonHikingTrails.com

 

Last year toward the end of July my wife Renae, daughter Nicole and I hiked the Taggart Lake – Beaver Creek Loop which is a pleasant loop hike of about 4 miles. It’s 3.2 miles if you just hike into Taggart Lake and then back out the same way (click on the link for more info on last year’s hike). One week later some friends and I hiked into near by Bradley Lake on the Bradley Lake Loop Trail which is just under 5 miles in and out.

This time I decided to hike to Taggart Lake and go part way around on the Beaver Creek Loop then double back and take the Bradley Lake Loop along the east shore of Taggart Lake and then over the glacial moraine into Bradley Lake.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

Early Monday morning I drove the 58 miles from my home to the trailhead parked my car in the parking lot, put my gear on and headed up the trail. The aspens don’t have all their leaves yet but are still quite beautiful.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

Taggart Creek is not too far up the trail and I seldom cross the bridge without stopping to capture the beauty of this stream. It’s a good thing there is a bridge because fording the stream would have been difficult with all the water coming down this year.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

The light of the morning sun was gorgeous, filtering through the trees and across the tops of the mountains.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

Just around the bend from the bridge over Taggart Creek were wildflowers that were looking fresh and happy. It had rained the night before and all the colors were crisp and bright. Just through the trees in the back ground I could see some mountain peaks glowing with morning sunlight.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

From there the trail climbs over a low ridge and on toward the majestic Teton mountain range. One of my favorite things about hiking in this area are the magnificent views from just about anywhere on the trail. Hard to beat!

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Taggart Lake, elev. 6902 ft, average depth 80 ft, size 110 acres

If you get here early the lake is usually ultra-calm and will produce some awesome reflections.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen – Taggart Lake

I arrived at the trailhead this morning about 6:30am and was the first car in the parking lot. So I had the trail and this lake all to myself for about the first hour. There was a lot of moose sign around so I half expected to see one at sometime or another. While photographing the lake I heard some heavy pounding on the trail behind me and turned expecting a moose but saw a woman out for a morning trail run. Trail runners are becoming a pretty common sight on the mountain trails.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

As I headed north along the northeast shore of Taggart Lake the trail began to wind and ascend through pines, Douglas Fir and meadows full of daisies.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

The trail continues to climb several hundred feet up a moraine (ridge) that separates the two lakes from each other.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen

On the other side of this moraine and down the slope is Bradley Lake and on these north slopes the trail is still covered by snow in many places sometimes making it difficult to follow.

 

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Photo by: Marc Bowen (iPhone pano) – Bradley Lake, elev. 7027 ft, size 215 acres

After leaving Bradley Lake I continued the loop trail back to the trailhead and the formerly empty parking lot was now full of cars, trucks and tour buses which is typical any day of the week during the summer.

It was so nice getting back out and hiking again especially in the Tetons. They still remain my favorite hiking destination!

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Menor’s Ferry & Chapel Of The Transfiguration

By: Marc Bowen

In September I drove to Grand Teton National Park to do some hiking but the area I planned to hike was closed for maintenance. So I drove over to check out the historical Menor’s Ferry area.This area is in the unincorporated community of Moose Wyoming. To get there I drove through the south entrance to the park and took the first right into a parking lot in front of The Chapel of the Transfiguration. It was a beautiful morning and the sun was just coming up. I decided that I would get a few shots of the chapel with the morning light on the mountains behind it.

 

CHAPEL OF THE TRANSFIGURATION, MOOSE IDAHO

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Chapel of the Transfiguration – Photo By: Marc Bowen

The Chapel was built in 1925 and provided religious services for dude ranchers and tourists who didn’t want to ride the 12 miles into Jackson. Services are still held here every Sunday during the summer time. It is also very popular for weddings.

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Chapel of the Transfiguration – Photo By: Marc Bowen

The Chapel can seat about 60 people and this amazingly beautiful view behind the altar is quite inspirational!

 

MENOR’S FERRY, MOOSE IDAHO

There is a paved path around the parking area that also loops through the trees along the nearby Snake River. Along this path are restrooms and a number of old historical buildings, cabins and such built in the late 1800’s.

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Menor’s Ferry – Photo By: Marc Bowen

Bill Menor made a homestead  claim on the west side of the river in about 1890. Using a cable system he built a ferry with docks and a wooden pontoon boat.

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Menor’s Ferry – Photo By: Marc Bowen

For homesteaders and ranchers living on the east side of the river this was the only place in Jackson Hole to cross over (and stay dry) into what is now Grand Teton National Park. Besides the ferry there was a store and blacksmith shop and all this became the center of the Moose area.

Another interesting fact I found out was that the Moose area was the setting for a motion picture in 1955 called ‘The Far Horizons’ about the Lewis and Clark expedition. It starred Fred MacMurray, Charleton Heston and Donna Reed.

This is a beautiful place with lots to see. The park visitor center is located here and is one of the nicest visitor centers I’ve been to…

Well, I may not have been able to do the hike I wanted but I still enjoyed my day and was able to see a few new places and ponder what it must have been like for those first homesteaders to live in this place. I can’t imagine how hard life would have been here. But to be able to see the beauty of the Tetons every day would have been ‘balm to the soul’ for sure!